Monday, July 15, 2013

White stuff from cows...

Why pressure can milk?
I personally pressure can milk and this is my personal favorite way to store milk. When I began to focus my storage on "Store what you eat, eat what you store", I realized that a majority of meals I prepared involved some sort of sauce, gravy, etc.

I don't really like the other types of stored milk (instant), but I have them stored for the long term & will use them. The milk I use is hormone free, 1/2 & 1/2,  milk from  a carton, like you would buy from a store. But, there are those who have done raw milk. I can not attest to their successes. I recommend that you do the research & determine what is best for you & your family. Here is what i have found about What the National Center for Home Food Preservation actually says about pressure canning milk.
I continually test jars of 1/2 & 1/2 that I stored in October 2012. (0614) I have finished using all of that batch of milk and now am using milk canned in early 2013.

How I pressure can milk and yes it milk needs to be PRESSURED CANNED because it is low acid, protein. I do not, repeat do not water bath any protein based food.
I start with sterilized jars, and carefully pour the milk in cold, straight from the container. Cleaned the rims with a towel soaked with a little vinegar. 



 After applying the sterilized lids and rings; I pressured canned the jars for 10 (15 for quarts) minutes at 10 lbs. of pressure for pints. 
After the pressure dropped, I took the jars out & let them cool overnight. Checked the lids. Then the next day I washed the jars off (to remove any milk residue) and let them dry. Generally I leave anything I have canned out for a few days to make sure that the lids have sealed properly. Label with date canned & what it is. Then I store them in a cool, dark, dry location.


NOTE ADDED June 2014: When using my milk, every now and then I will find a jar that has what looks like clotted milk. I believe I have a hot spot on my stove top. See below. Initially I was hesitant, but I took care in testing it. Each time I smell it & taste it. This one was particularly thick, remember I use 1/2 & 1/2. 

 

I just whisk it smooth and haven't had any problems. Here I was making bread pudding from storage, the link to "how to" ----> Do you remember bread pudding? Made from 100% storage items.



Thank you for dropping by & please feel free to like Perky Prepping Gramma on Facebook  share & pin. I actually do what I post & share my actual journey of preparation. From dehydrating, canning. water storage or something as simple as how to use a P-38 can opener, I test it out and share the results. The the time to look around and see what type of work helps you get you better prepared for an emergency. Thank you!




Edited: 06/06/14 Someone asked about the timing difference between this and butter. What I try to remember to recommend is talked about here is this post Controversy, education, wise choices..


                          

I also have an online Amazon Associate/store called Perky Prepping Gramma's Store. This allows me to show you the products I have personally used and endorse, while monetizing my work. What I found early on was people would ask me where I got such & such an item and I would simply share a link.  Perky Prepping Gramma's Store So, I created a store of these items I use frequently or recommend. It doesn't cost you anything extra, but I do receive a small percentage as an advertising bonus, if you purchase from my store. You are even able to just link in and do any of your regular Amazon shopping. Thank you for your consideration.
I know there are established, long term canning, prepping bloggers that have canned & dehydrated milk. 
New USDA Guidelines
Water, Juice and Milk (pasteurizing milk)

17 comments:

  1. Is this similar to shelf stable milk?

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    Replies
    1. Pretty much like shelf stable, Since I am using whole milk & 1/2 & 1/2, it tastes better, in my opinion.

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  2. Are you mixing the milk and the half and half together? Or each separate? I love this idea. I need to do it. Thank you!

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    1. Cynthia, I simply use half & half because it is a preference.

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  3. I am so doing this. I just called my wife and sent her a link to this blog post. I am also sharing it on facebook.

    Alec

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    Replies
    1. Hi Alec,
      Looking forward to seeing you post a picture when you do it! Thanks for the share.

      Delete
  4. You mention "testing" the milk. Is it simply a smell and taste test or do you have a different method of testing I am unaware of?

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    Replies
    1. Tessa,
      Yes, I smell and taste each jar when I open it.

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  5. I was wondering what the time and pressure would be for here in the Rockies? We are at about 6000 ft?

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    Replies
    1. I haven't tried flavored coffee creamers. Probably I would not try canning that because of the sugar content, but possibly try dehydrating.
      http://perkypreppinggramma.blogspot.com/2015/05/how-to-dehydrate-milk-for-long-term.html

      Delete
  6. I was wondering what the time and pressure would be for here in the Rockies? We are at about 6000 ft?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Here ou go. http://perkypreppinggramma.blogspot.com/2013/11/attitude-altitude-aptitude.html

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  7. Do you think this would work for flavored coffee creamers? Have frozen them before but takes up too much room in freezer.

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    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  8. There is a chance you are eligible for a free $1,000 Amazon Gift Card.

    ReplyDelete